Bay of Fires Clothbound Cheddar

CHARACTERISTICS

Bay of Fires cloth-bound cheddar is made using traditional methods, including the all- important “cheddaring” technique. The young wheels are hand rubbed with lard before being matured for at least 12 months (and up to 2 years) on pine boards, which gives the cheese unique characteristics. The cheese has a distinctive buttery yellow colour, the flavour is what a true cheddar should be – sharp, rounded, slightly salty and with a lingering finish. The authentic crumbly texture ticks all the boxes too.

A little history

With any great cheese there is usually some history or a great story behind it. Bay of Fires’ Ian Fowler is a 13th generation cheesemaker, originally from England. The Fowler family dates back to the 1600’s, making them one of the oldest continuously operating cheesemaking families in England (Ian’s brother still runs the Fowlers business in Warwickshire). Ian and his family moved to Australia in 2009, basing themselves in the picturesque East Coast of Tasmania, with a small herd of specially bred cows that graze on lush Tasmanian grass. The cheese is made every second day using only milk from the family’s herd, and following techniques passed down to Ian by his grandfather in England. Much of the hard work is done by hand, including milling and salting the curd, and Ian made a lot of the cheesemaking equipment himself. Due to the small-batch, hand-made nature of the cheese, availability is limited, so we are very lucky to have Bay of Fires Cloth- Bound Cheddar as part of the Harper & Blohm range.

Goes well with:

Tasmanian cider or Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, red Bordeaux

Similar cheeses:

Traditional English cloth-bound Cheddars such as Montgomery’s and Quickes Vintage

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Cheese Details
  • Cheese Type: Cheddars & Territorials
  • Country: Australia
  • Milk Type: Cow
  • Pasteurisation: Pasteurised
  • Rennet Type: Non Animal
  • Classification: Farmhouse

Printable Cheese Note

$21.40

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